Busting the “BAD Diabetic” Mythe

the :"Bad Diabetic" Mythe

I am always intrigued when people report on a fellow family member or friend who is a “BAD” diabetic.   I tell them I have had diabetes for 45 years,  and then I  hear, well they are a “really BAD” diabetic.   People, all diabetes is BAD, and yes I know they are referring to the high blood sugars this individual frequently has, or how many time they have been hospitalized from hyper/hypoglycemic events.  This, however,  makes him/her and “UNEDUCATED” diabetic rather than a BAD diabetic.  Even with all my preaching, if my infusion site gets compromised by a patient pulling at my pump, and I cannot change it until much later, or if I’ve eaten something prepared at a restaurant that I was not aware should have been so laden with sugars or starches,  I too, can have a raging high blood sugar.   What makes one a “BAD” diabetic is not knowing why you’re hyperglycemic or worse, not checking your BS readings sooner to correct.

A patient of mine informed me his grandson was a bad diabetic.  This individual is in his early thirties, thin frame, and apparently healthy and active.    He tells me his sugars are always jumping around, usually extremely high.  He informs me they have been  this way for over 15 years, since his accident.  I inquire if he has looked into an insulin pump, he appears to be the perfect candidate.  He casually informs  me that he is  ”too active”  for a pump,  and of course my response is; that would make you the perfect person.   The next day,  I was informed he would not be visiting grandpa.  as he woke with his blood sugar in the 600s!!!  Not too sure how accurate this was, however, I asked if he was alright.  The grandparent reports ”Oh yeah”, he’s doing find, making himself some lunch and resting.  I inquired as to what this “child” cooks for himself and grand dad proudly reports he cooked himself some eggs, bacon, sausage, home fried potatoes and biscuits.  I innocently asked,  “for one meal?”  and he laughed and said “of course”,  and I cried on the inside.

This is the same grandson I offered my website card to, I offered to talk to him about using a pump and how he was the perfect candidate for one,  I offered an ear or advise any time he needed it and I was told he has someone who helps him.  I asked if it was an endocrinologist, or an internist or a diabetic educator and he reports no, it is the “guy who helps me with my prosthetic leg”, and again, I cried on the inside.

Like many diabetics I’ve come in contact with in the health field,  several are awesome, many more are not, and if it is due to being uneducated, I have a hard time with this as the information is out there, websites, classes, brochures, meetings and more.    As my last article reports (“Diabetes Health, You’re in Charge”, April 14, 2014),  more and more programs seek to educate diabetics and are covered by insurance.  Sadly to say, all that is left are the “LAZY” diabetics, who are complacent in their ignorance because it is easier, and as complications and disabilities set in, there are the  ObamaCare hand-0uts.   Preventative measures are priceless.   Personal responsibility has become a thing of the past, it doesn’t pay.  Becoming disabled and complaining that you didn’t know won’t, and shouldn’t,  work forever.  Educate yourself now, read those articles or  watch the  videos,  while you still have good vision.

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