Category: Diabetes Education

Sluggish Start: The 5 Worst Breakfast Foods — Health Hub from Cleveland Clinic

5 Worst Breakfast Choices we thought were healthy

I know first thing in the a.m is not the best time to have to make smart decisions, however, it IS the most important time.  I have just had fits trying to find the most satisfying, yet healthy breakfast foods as lately, I am trying to seriously cut back on grains and whole wheat, so I started reverting back to a snack I learned from a physical therapist I used to work with; 1/2 cup cottage cheese (low fat),  less than a 1/4 cup steel cut whole oats (uncooked), with assorted berries and a sprinkle of raisins.  Like a wet granola, tasty and  not too bad for you.  Then I was told to cut out dairy, as I was recently diagnoses with Rheumatoid Arthritis.  Well that took care of the wet granola breakfast.

Doughnut

1. Doughnut and pastries: A recipe for weight gain

Doughnuts will cost you 250–550 calories, but the 20–50 grams of sugar in each is the real problem. With such a huge amount of sugar in a small package, your body pumps out lots of insulin to accommodate. A huge blood sugar peak leads to an even bigger sugar crash. This extreme up-and-down leaves you hungry soon after your breakfast — and you’ll crave more refined carbs. It’s a vicious cycle of unhealthy eating that starts with the first doughnut.

Sausage biscuit

2. Sausage biscuit: Hypertension’s helper

The sausage biscuit is basically a saturated fat and sodium bomb nestled in a trans fat sleeping bag. If your blood vessels could talk, they would plead, “Please don’t do it to us!” as you place your order at the fast-food drive-through. The sky-high sodium in the highly processed sausage can make your blood pressure surge. If you have hypertension, it may increase your risk for stroke. Nitrates and nitrites in sausage have been linked to increased risk in certain cancers, too.

coffee

3. Flavored non-dairy creamer: A coffee disaster

If you think non-dairy creamer is a healthy option, think again. Many non-dairy creamers simply swap saturated fat for trans fat (check the label for “partially hydrogenated” oil), plus sugar and artificial sweeteners. Trans fat increases your risk of heart attack and stroke by increasing LDL cholesterol. Predictions say decreasing trans fat consumption by even a little could help prevent more than 10,000 deaths a year. To perk up your coffee, try unsweetened vanilla almond milk, low-fat milk or a small amount of chocolate milk instead.

cereal

4. Bright, sugary cereals: A rainbow of hyperactivity

Those magically colored kids’ cereals aren’t such a bright choice. The FDA has noted that food dyes may contribute to hyperactivity in children with ADHD, even if not in other children. A 2012 study backed up that idea but said more research is needed. The UK and EU recently banned food dyes in food manufacturing; perhaps you should ban the fake stuff from your breakfast table. Even if food coloring’s effects aren’t fully understood, these cereals are usually loaded with sugar — empty calories for your little ones.

5. Loaded bagel: An invitation for diabetes

Your body works hard to keep you functioning at night. Don’t thank it with inflammation-causing calories in the form of a bagel loaded with cream cheese or margarine. Except for the occasional 100 percent whole grain option, most bagels are 300–500 calories worth of starch. Slathering on cream cheese or butter adds more calories and saturated fat. Diets high in refined carbohydrates have been linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, so don’t make bagels a regular morning meal.

I’ve just recently returned from a nutrition class in Asheville, “Diabesity” is the new catch phrase, which to me, is stereotyping, however, mostly true.  Loved the speaker, highly educated and straight to the point.  Her healthful advise for a satisfying breakfast, or even snack later in the day;  3/4 cup of plain Greek yogurt,  a variety of sliced/diced berries, or whichever is your favorite, and a 1/4 of a cup of chopped walnuts, squirting a little raw honey on this will make your children love it.   It is not as difficult as it sounds, you just have to want to be healthy and make a conscious effort to do it.  Your kids will learn through you, and seeing you make the effort for yourself and them, will instill good habits in their little heads.

 

8 Healthy Foods That Make You Fat

8 Healthy Foods that Make You Fat

Many foods considered to be healthy, can be a fat trap waiting to happen when we let our guard down.  Just because they are considered “healthy” does not mean eat to your hearts content.  Some just take common sense and possibly re-reading my Nutrition Trap article  (1/7/2014) to familiarize yourself with serving size and carb counts on packaged foods ie;  pasta, granola etc, and smart measuring on fruits and nuts before eating.  And by all means, do not eat all the high calorie dense foods in one day.  They are meant to be eaten sparingly as they carry loads of calories in a very small amount, these are considered “calorically dense foods” and will put weight on you.

The following list is from BioTrust Nutrition, (5/13/14).

Here are some “healthy” examples of calorically dense foods:

1. Granola – granola, especially the varieties mixed with nuts can pack as many as 500 cals per cup!

2. Pasta – a moderate 1 and 1/2 cups of most pastas yield more than 60 grams of carbs and almost 350 calories

3. Avocado – avocado is awesome and a great source of monounsaturated fat, but one single avocado is over 300 calories and 30 grams of fat

4. Nuts and Nut Butters – nuts are super healthy, but one of the most calorically dense foods around. A few ounces could mean 400+ calories

5. Fruit Juice and Smoothies – all fruit juices are loaded with sugar and so are most “smoothie” shop smoothies (make your own with whole fruit)

6. Dried Fruit – dried fruits remove the water content which dramatically decreases volume…what’s left is high in sugar and very calorically dense

7. “Whole Wheat” Breads – even the 100% whole wheat variety can pack a mean calorie punch if you’re eating a lot of grains as part of your diet

8. Whole Grain Bagels – a large “deli” bagel is loaded with carbs and calories, many times over 400 cals in a single bagel

While some of the foods above are only “thought” to be healthy (fruit juice, whole grain bagels, etc), stuff like nuts, nut butters, and avocado are foods that they recommend in just about everyone’s diet and they are indeed great choices, if used sparingly.  Personally, I’m staying away from as much whole wheat grains, bagels and breads as possible and even less of the pasta, however, that is a personal decision due to poor control of my sugar after eating, unless I jack up my pump.

That said, these calorically dense foods require that you monitor your intake of them closely. A few ounces of nuts, a couple tablespoons of nut butter, and an avocado is NOT a lot of food, but if you ate all of these every day, you’d be getting close to 1000 calories just right there.

So enjoy a treat now and again, allow yourself to enjoy them as a treat, a little at a time, not all you can eat food supply, and as always, monitor how YOUR blood sugars to see how your system handles these foods.  Remember, if something in high in fat, it takes longer to raise you blood sugar than a quick, simple sugar/carb.

 

Busting the “BAD Diabetic” Mythe

the :"Bad Diabetic" Mythe

I am always intrigued when people report on a fellow family member or friend who is a “BAD” diabetic.   I tell them I have had diabetes for 45 years,  and then I  hear, well they are a “really BAD” diabetic.   People, all diabetes is BAD, and yes I know they are referring to the high blood sugars this individual frequently has, or how many time they have been hospitalized from hyper/hypoglycemic events.  This, however,  makes him/her and “UNEDUCATED” diabetic rather than a BAD diabetic.  Even with all my preaching, if my infusion site gets compromised by a patient pulling at my pump, and I cannot change it until much later, or if I’ve eaten something prepared at a restaurant that I was not aware should have been so laden with sugars or starches,  I too, can have a raging high blood sugar.   What makes one a “BAD” diabetic is not knowing why you’re hyperglycemic or worse, not checking your BS readings sooner to correct.

A patient of mine informed me his grandson was a bad diabetic.  This individual is in his early thirties, thin frame, and apparently healthy and active.    He tells me his sugars are always jumping around, usually extremely high.  He informs me they have been  this way for over 15 years, since his accident.  I inquire if he has looked into an insulin pump, he appears to be the perfect candidate.  He casually informs  me that he is  ”too active”  for a pump,  and of course my response is; that would make you the perfect person.   The next day,  I was informed he would not be visiting grandpa.  as he woke with his blood sugar in the 600s!!!  Not too sure how accurate this was, however, I asked if he was alright.  The grandparent reports ”Oh yeah”, he’s doing find, making himself some lunch and resting.  I inquired as to what this “child” cooks for himself and grand dad proudly reports he cooked himself some eggs, bacon, sausage, home fried potatoes and biscuits.  I innocently asked,  “for one meal?”  and he laughed and said “of course”,  and I cried on the inside.

This is the same grandson I offered my website card to, I offered to talk to him about using a pump and how he was the perfect candidate for one,  I offered an ear or advise any time he needed it and I was told he has someone who helps him.  I asked if it was an endocrinologist, or an internist or a diabetic educator and he reports no, it is the “guy who helps me with my prosthetic leg”, and again, I cried on the inside.

Like many diabetics I’ve come in contact with in the health field,  several are awesome, many more are not, and if it is due to being uneducated, I have a hard time with this as the information is out there, websites, classes, brochures, meetings and more.    As my last article reports (“Diabetes Health, You’re in Charge”, April 14, 2014),  more and more programs seek to educate diabetics and are covered by insurance.  Sadly to say, all that is left are the “LAZY” diabetics, who are complacent in their ignorance because it is easier, and as complications and disabilities set in, there are the  ObamaCare hand-0uts.   Preventative measures are priceless.   Personal responsibility has become a thing of the past, it doesn’t pay.  Becoming disabled and complaining that you didn’t know won’t, and shouldn’t,  work forever.  Educate yourself now, read those articles or  watch the  videos,  while you still have good vision.

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