Tagged: high fructose corn syrup

Sluggish Start: The 5 Worst Breakfast Foods — Health Hub from Cleveland Clinic

5 Worst Breakfast Choices we thought were healthy

I know first thing in the a.m is not the best time to have to make smart decisions, however, it IS the most important time.  I have just had fits trying to find the most satisfying, yet healthy breakfast foods as lately, I am trying to seriously cut back on grains and whole wheat, so I started reverting back to a snack I learned from a physical therapist I used to work with; 1/2 cup cottage cheese (low fat),  less than a 1/4 cup steel cut whole oats (uncooked), with assorted berries and a sprinkle of raisins.  Like a wet granola, tasty and  not too bad for you.  Then I was told to cut out dairy, as I was recently diagnoses with Rheumatoid Arthritis.  Well that took care of the wet granola breakfast.

Doughnut

1. Doughnut and pastries: A recipe for weight gain

Doughnuts will cost you 250–550 calories, but the 20–50 grams of sugar in each is the real problem. With such a huge amount of sugar in a small package, your body pumps out lots of insulin to accommodate. A huge blood sugar peak leads to an even bigger sugar crash. This extreme up-and-down leaves you hungry soon after your breakfast — and you’ll crave more refined carbs. It’s a vicious cycle of unhealthy eating that starts with the first doughnut.

Sausage biscuit

2. Sausage biscuit: Hypertension’s helper

The sausage biscuit is basically a saturated fat and sodium bomb nestled in a trans fat sleeping bag. If your blood vessels could talk, they would plead, “Please don’t do it to us!” as you place your order at the fast-food drive-through. The sky-high sodium in the highly processed sausage can make your blood pressure surge. If you have hypertension, it may increase your risk for stroke. Nitrates and nitrites in sausage have been linked to increased risk in certain cancers, too.

coffee

3. Flavored non-dairy creamer: A coffee disaster

If you think non-dairy creamer is a healthy option, think again. Many non-dairy creamers simply swap saturated fat for trans fat (check the label for “partially hydrogenated” oil), plus sugar and artificial sweeteners. Trans fat increases your risk of heart attack and stroke by increasing LDL cholesterol. Predictions say decreasing trans fat consumption by even a little could help prevent more than 10,000 deaths a year. To perk up your coffee, try unsweetened vanilla almond milk, low-fat milk or a small amount of chocolate milk instead.

cereal

4. Bright, sugary cereals: A rainbow of hyperactivity

Those magically colored kids’ cereals aren’t such a bright choice. The FDA has noted that food dyes may contribute to hyperactivity in children with ADHD, even if not in other children. A 2012 study backed up that idea but said more research is needed. The UK and EU recently banned food dyes in food manufacturing; perhaps you should ban the fake stuff from your breakfast table. Even if food coloring’s effects aren’t fully understood, these cereals are usually loaded with sugar — empty calories for your little ones.

5. Loaded bagel: An invitation for diabetes

Your body works hard to keep you functioning at night. Don’t thank it with inflammation-causing calories in the form of a bagel loaded with cream cheese or margarine. Except for the occasional 100 percent whole grain option, most bagels are 300–500 calories worth of starch. Slathering on cream cheese or butter adds more calories and saturated fat. Diets high in refined carbohydrates have been linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, so don’t make bagels a regular morning meal.

I’ve just recently returned from a nutrition class in Asheville, “Diabesity” is the new catch phrase, which to me, is stereotyping, however, mostly true.  Loved the speaker, highly educated and straight to the point.  Her healthful advise for a satisfying breakfast, or even snack later in the day;  3/4 cup of plain Greek yogurt,  a variety of sliced/diced berries, or whichever is your favorite, and a 1/4 of a cup of chopped walnuts, squirting a little raw honey on this will make your children love it.   It is not as difficult as it sounds, you just have to want to be healthy and make a conscious effort to do it.  Your kids will learn through you, and seeing you make the effort for yourself and them, will instill good habits in their little heads.

 

Nutrition Traps

Nutrition Traps

It’s easy to go out to dinner and choose their “healthy choices” menu items, however, the most important question to ask is,  “healthy for whom?”  Of course, being a PWD for 45 yrs, I would naturally go for foods offering;  a.) less sugar,  b.)less fat,  c.)less carbohydrates,  d.)less fried,  and/or e.)less calories…???  The “healthy options are endless, and for the unknowing person, it can all be overwhelming.  This is why I stress “educating yourself”  learn to read nutrition labels on packages, learn the differences in fats, good carbs/bad carbs, and most importantly, learn that you are not protected by FDA who allows companies to make  false claims on food labels who say they are healthy if they fit “their”  guidelines of healthy.  (such as GMOs).  

Well, here are the  quickest solutions to this trick  question;   a.)  if there is less fat, there will be  more sugar added  for flavor,   b.)  if there  is less sugar, there will be more fat added for flavor,  c.) if there is a carb count, is it simple or complex carbs they’re eliminating,  or is it  the “other carbs”??  d.) pick broiled or baked  over fried anytime, however, if it must be fried, inquire on the kind of oil they are using,  e) less calories means almost nothing today,  unless you are sincerely using your calorie counter with each and everything you put  in your mouth, if it is one of those food “casserole” with hundreds of calories where someone could not decide which bad thing to put in, so they put  it all in,  just  SAY NO!  The point to know about fats;  saturated is the worst,  HINT, saturated is the fat that when left in room temperature, it forms a spongy, grayish layer over the top as it cools,  yumm!!  Followed by Trans fats,   Mono and polyunsaturated fat is safest, they are plant based not animal or chemical.    When doing your own cooking, (always the healthiest choice, but I know, it’s hard to find time) use pure virgin Olive Oil, and side note,  have been doing my own research on news of margarine being one molecule away from plastic, I am now convinced this is over exaggerated, however I will still use butter in small amounts.

When reading those nutrition labels,  make your self familiar with “serving size”  or servings  per container mainly because this is the number you must  multiply all the other numbers with for an accurate count.  I have a good appetite, some single serving containers that I could eat in an instant,  are actually packaged for 2 people, so those numbers must be doubled.  Yeah, it’s all a trick to make it appear healthy.

What about all those healthy yogurt commercials, yikes, don’t get me started.   The healthy weight, fat and sugar free variety may have no fat, but they are loaded with high fructose corn syrup, for added sweetness, (reread paragraph 2), which if you read my earlier post, is horrible for you. (Fructose, the Other Evil, 10/17/2013)  Syrupy fruits added, HFCS as well.  Probiotic yogurts fail to tell you that during the high heat processing, all the probiotic organism are killed, this in turn negates the “good” of the probiotics.    One solution given is getting Organic Plain Greek Yogurt, add some real honey, some fresh fruit and I add flaxseed for a nutty taste,  and enjoy.    Processed foods, chemical additives, some you don’t even realize are  chemicals, and sugar substitutes are all things to monitor.    This can, and should be done to keep you and your family healthy for many more years. (and it teaches good habits to youngsters.)

Holiday Stress

Holiday Stress

Yes, the Holidays are upon us.  Shopping, decorating, eating,  spending, cooking, eating,  planning, visiting, eating.  See a pattern here?  Food, and I use the term losely, will be available and offered continuously.  Most, however, is  fat, high fructose corn syrup,  and sugar filled snacks, treats and desserts.  Sure someone worked hard to make them,  with love I’m sure, however, if the person preparing these goodies really cares, they will not be insulted by your refusal, or your “O.K., but just a bite”, reply, and more importantly, they should not even try to make us feel guilty for not indulging.

This time of year is a good excuse for cheating, and we all do, yes, even me!!!!  We must, however, choose our cheats carefully, not just one of each, or, I’ll starve myself tomorrow.  Homemade foods, desserts especially, are very hard to guesstimate the carb load and the numerous other ingredient that will raise that blood sugar number up, not to  mention blood fats, blood pressure, ets.  If we could just not feel like we are being punished or ripped-off because we should not eat it all, and work on a mind-set of being thankful that we have a legitimate  excuse, or easy out, for not packing on the pounds, or feeling  bloated or stuffed.  Yes, it is a whole new mind set, I’ve been working on it for many years, but it works for me.   The important people I’m around understand, the others I really don’t care if they do.  Ignorance runs amok when it comes to good, safe foods and snacks, and you can see it in appearances.

Be safe this Holiday, be careful to use moderation, and if it makes the cavities  in your teeth hurt to eat it,  watch out!!!

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