Tagged: PWD

the “Tour for a Cure”, full speed ahead!!!

walk for the cure

Being given the diagnosis of Type I or Type II diabetic is like a punch in the gut.  I was 12 or 13 and can remember feeling very alone.  No one else in the neighborhood, my school, or family had even had it.   I saw the fear and confusion in the faces of several friends at work after being told they had Type II, and my heart went out to them, and I remembered back to my diagnosis all those years ago and how I felt.  Many years later I learned about the different events and rallys being held in support of finding a cure for this disease.   I have always donated to several associations yearly, however, I never felt the full impact of the numbers of people who benefit from these donations until I did my first 5K walk for diabetes.

Pulling up to the event and  walking into the crowd of people, young and old, all with there own personal relationship with diabetes, I truly felt connected.  Not knowing anyone there, just simply going through the sign-up and listening to people around me who are “regulars” at these events, I felt a kinship.  Needless to say, I soon was conversing with others and enjoying the events, but it wasn’t until we began the walk, looking ahead and behind me at the numbers of people who gathered in this place, who were affected by diabetes, and that they were all together to help,  well,  needless to say, my eyes watered up numerous times.  I felt as if I was walking with all their arms around me, even though I did not know a single one personally.    Sounds kind of silly I know, however, I’m getting misty right now remembering this feeling and trying to put it into words.  I’ve done several since, and always get this feeling of overwhelming warmth and companionship.

It is now spring, walking, running and biking weather, so I recommend you do yourself a huge favor and attend one of these events.  You don’t even have to complete the walk if you are not able, but the attempt is uplifting, physically and spiritually, and we can all use a day of up-beat, energetic people around us.  Please be careful to bring monitors, meds and treats for a safe walk or run, remember  be “proactive”.   If you’ve been reading my blogs, you know to be prepared.   You can find these events in your local bulletins, newspapers or get on one of the websites; Diabetes Forecast for example has a great list,    diabetes.org/tour.  Last years Tour de Cure,  raised over 29 million dollars!!!

Glycemic Index Basics

healthychoicesAn overload of nutritional information out there in the cyber world  has made finding the simplest answers extremely confusing,  even for me, who has felt fairly secure in my knowledge of “good vs evil” food exchanges and choices.  To add to the confusion, good carb/bad carb is now complicated by glycemic index numbers, and not just glycemic index, but glycemic load  numbers to add to the confusion.   The February 2014 issue of Diabetes Forecast,  one of my favorite Go-To resources has an exceptional article,  Carbs; Beyond the Basics,   which is where much of my following references are taken.

The glycemic index (GI) measures the glucose response to a given number of grams of  carbohydrates.  They would measure your glucose levels during the first 2 hours after consuming 50 grams of  carbs.  These carbs are then compared to the response of blood glucose spikes after consuming 50 grams of pure glucose.  They then, label these foods High GI or Low GI, obviously, Low GI are much better as glucose does not rise dangerously after your meal.  Sounds simple right? Wrong, because it was then realized by the ADA that following a low GI diet alone, did not make any measureable difference in you A1C.   So the Glycemic Load was invented.   This  factors in two important measures of diabetes control;  carb counting and the glycemic index.   While carb counting considers the total amount of carbohydrates,  the glycemic index accounts for the quality of THAT carbohydrate,  the glycemic load considers both.   The best example;  1 cup of mashed potato  vs 1 cup of watermelon, both high on the glycemic index, however, because 1 cup of mashed potato has a much higher carb count, its’  glycemic load is  higher.

There can be up to a “threefold difference in the glucose response to the same quantity of carbohydrates.”   to  confuse matters  more,  a foods origin, how it was cooked/prepared, the degree of processing, ripeness, and even the brand all affect these numbers.  Things to consider;  choose unprocessed foods, bypass “puffed” grain products, as well as “instant” products like oatmeal, instant potatoes, rice.   There is even a difference in over-cooked grains/starches, cold potatoes are preferred, and fruit which is not overly ripe.

I would advise that you get on the site for Diabetes Forecast and read this article.  They cover a bit more and explain in better detail the “why nots” of the above food choices.  I found this tid-bit of info amazing,   the glycemic index measures were not done on PWD?  Which qualifies my belief that our diabetes and our bodies respond differently than the next person, as a matter of fact, my body does not react the same way to the same foods eaten from day to day…..

Vacation Nightmare with the Pump!!!

Vacation Nightmare with Pump

I consider myself to be well organized in matters of my diabetes.  I have been doing basically the same routine for over 40 years, maybe only 15 years with the pump, and each time I have to readjust my routine, something goes awry.  Unfortunately this time I was on a cruise ship.

When packing, always make sure to have extra everything, which I do, and in my travel bag I have designated a baggie with extra infusion set, prep pads, and alcohol swabs, basically the things that have no expiration date.  On my most recent trip, I packed 2 extra cylinders of insulin for my pump, which must be kept refrigerated.  So once arriving at my mothers house in Fl. Lauderdale, into the fridge went my back-up insulin, as we were there several days ahead of cruising.  Morning of cruise arrived, we were packed and ready to go.  While waiting for our cabin to be ready,  we relaxed on the  back deck, already meeting some characters whom we would be sharing this adventure with.   Hours later, after enjoying our first of many great meals, it dawned on me, yeah you guessed it.  My extra insulin was still in my moms fridge.  Needless to say, panic set in, more for my poor husband than me.  I new I had enough in the pump for 3 days, surely we could buy some somewhere.

Next morning we visited the infirmary,  quickly being told that they had some, however, they did not sell whole bottles and it was costly.  The MD told us our first stop was on Cozumel, where he was sure the main pharmacy there would have some cheaper.  Apparently, money was not the object at this point, as my husband was ready to have me heliported back to Ft. Lauderdale.   After a 6 mile taxi ride into the main village, going from one so called “pharmacy” to the next, all within blocks of each other,  we soon realized they call any corner store that sells suntan lotion and toothpaste, a pharmacy.  Following another lead, we came upon a Medical Clinic, surely they would have some.  They did not.  The look on my husbands face made me so sad, that I had caused him all this grief and worry.  The clinic was kind enough to call the “Mega Pharmacy”  before we trekked over there, another 3miles away.  Success!!!

We made it there in no time as my husband’s pace seemed to have increased at this point.  We entered and spoke with the only clerk who understood us, it took them time to find, for some reason, but it was a trusted name brand of insulin.  NEXT!!!   The cost was very reasonable, as we are all aware, we in the states are getting ripped off for pharmaceuticals, this bottle cost me what my co-pay is with insurance, however, my credit card rejected payment due to “security reasons” and being used out of the usual territory.   NOTE TO SELF,  next time I travel I will call the credit card company first.  I couldn’t use my cell, too expensive, so we paid cash, a whopping $35.   Now  for the pilgrimage back to the ship,  after attaining some ice in a baggie to put insulin in for the long walk back, there was a sigh of relief.  I just didn’t inform my husband that the only canister I had was the one in the pump which are not meant to be refilled.  Once the  piston has pushed cork up to top, there is not an  empty compartment left for insulin.  (if you use a pump, you will appreciate this next move.)  In my McGyveresq thinking, I took an empty syringe, filled it with air and pushed it into canister several times, eventually the cork was pushed back to bottom and I was able to refill my canister for the end of the trip.

All  in all, I missed one day of using the pump, I simply took  many shots and lots of  finger sticks to check,  like the old days.    Blood sugars stayed 130 or lower and I was able to enjoy the rest of the trip, ready for my next vacation,  with better preparation.

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